betacity


parkscore
April 25, 2015, 12:25 pm
Filed under: Cities | Tags: , ,

New York_NY-page-1 New York_NY-page-0

These are data and maps from a site called parkscore, based on walkscore. You can look at a live version of the map here.

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new Danish tunnel
March 28, 2015, 12:38 pm
Filed under: Transit | Tags: , , ,



good outcomes for higher taxes
January 6, 2015, 7:28 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , ,

Here is the last paragraph of Eric Jaffe’s article on gas taxes in the US. It projects some very good outcomes for higher gasoline taxes:

But in the long-run Americans would see some very real benefits from a price of gas that most closely reflected the true cost of driving. Fewer loved ones killed in car crashes. Healthier pregnancies and babies. More time spent with family and friends. Better access to jobs, and perhaps as productivity increased, higher wages. More livable developments and, with them, slimmer waistlines. Cleaner and quieter air. The sorts of things we can’t fit in our purses or wallets, but which cost us dearly just the same.

The Real Reason U.S. Gas Is So Cheap Is Americans Don’t Pay the True Cost of Driving, A gas tax that fully corrected for the social impact of car reliance would upend life as we know it, Eric Jaffe



gas tax
January 6, 2015, 7:20 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

Tscharaktschiew, Economics of Transportation (2014)



who owns the street?
January 4, 2015, 3:09 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,
I recently saw a guy in an oversize pickup almost hit a girl while turning a corner. He yelled at her – watch where you’re going, you’ll get yourself killed – in his mind it was her fault. Some of us onlookers yelled back at him and he drove off. He wasn’t used to not getting his two tonne way.
Below is a history of what it used to be like: manslaughter charges, the driver responsible not the pedestrian, streets for multiple uses, fatalities a public issue. Car lobbies changed all that and might became right and today we have bullies in a playground.

It wasn’t always like this. Browse through New York Times accounts of pedestrians dying after being struck by automobiles prior to 1930, and you’ll see that in nearly every case, the driver is charged with something like “technical manslaughter.” And it wasn’t just New York. Across the country, drivers were held criminally responsible when they killed or injured people with their vehicles.

[…]

“If you ask people today what a street is for, they will say cars,” says Norton. “That’s practically the opposite of what they would have said 100 years ago.”

[…]

“If a child is struck and killed by a car in 2012, it is treated as a private loss, to be grieved privately by the family,” Norton says. “Before, this stuff was treated as a public loss – much like the death of soldiers.” Mayors dedicated monuments to the victims of traffic crimes, accompanied by marching bands and children dressed in white, carrying flowers.

[…]

Norton explains that in the automobile’s earliest years, the principles of common law applied to crashes. In the case of a collision, the larger, heavier vehicle was deemed to be at fault. The responsibility for crashes always lay with the driver.

[…]

The industry lobbied to change the law, promoting the adoption of traffic statutes to supplant common law. The statutes were designed to restrict pedestrian use of the street and give primacy to cars. The idea of “jaywalking” – a concept that had not really existed prior to 1920 – was enshrined in law.

The current configuration of the American street, and the rules that govern it, are not the result of some inevitable organic process. “It’s more like a brawl,” says Norton. “Where the strongest brawler wins.”

The Invention of Jaywalking, The forgotten history of how the auto industry won the right of way for cars, Sarah Goodyear



I’m not subsidized!

The suburbs are subsidized? I didn’t pay for my split level and my SUV? Not for the gas I consume?

No you didn’t. But why should we care? We need to spend our tax money on something and it may as well be the things that people want, including cars and houses on acreage and cheap energy.

Well there are reasons to care. Besides the rank hypocrisy of the subsidized libertarian, sprawl and its discontents are one of the biggest contributors to public debt.

Here is an excerpt from Chakrabarti’s book A Country of Cities which lists ways to end the subsidies. Prescriptions are: take away subsidies for mortgages in suburban areas; don’t subsidize gas; price gas to include pollution and congestion; percapita distribution of federal monies to multimodal transportation.

Good ideas that few believe and ever fewer want; all the more reason to talk about them:

While the ‘inversion’ is irrefutable and, some would argue, welcome, few examine the potential long-term benefits of this trend – particularly if government rather than promoting suburbanization instead encouraged urbanism, or at least gave it an even chance. The necessary changes would include modifying or curtailing the vast array of  federal policies that currently subsidize suburban America, including: phasing out the federal home mortgage interest deduction (MID); ceasing the backing by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac of large mortgages that otherwise would not be underwritten by the private market; removing subsidies for the oil industry; reclassifying SUVs and minivans as light trucks; allocating federal transportation dollars by population, and distributing those dollars fairly across all modes of transportation, including rail and mass transit, instead of disproportionately funding highways and runways; streamlining the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) to drastically reduce the red tape associated with urban development and building large-scale infrastructure; and, finally, pricing fuel to reflect what economists call the ‘negative externalities,’ or the actual price of gas if the societal costs of pollution and congestion were included (many economists put this price at $10 or more per gallon.)

As we will see in the pages that follow, such policy reforms would dramatically improve our economy, our environment, and our chances for equal opportunity. Achieving consensus for these changes, however, would be a tremendous challenge, and would require a recasting of the political spectrum as we know it. People are accustomed to their subsidies, particularly those in the middle class, who tend to believe they are not subsidized at all.

Vishaan Chakrabarti, A Country of Cities, p 38.



September 13, 2014, 11:28 pm
Filed under: Cities, streets, Suburbs | Tags: , ,

One-Mile Walk in a Compact Neighborhood

A one-mile walk in Seattle’s Phinney Ridge takes you through a grid-like street network with a mix of residences and businesses.

One-Mile Walk in a Sprawling Suburb

A one-mile walk in Bellevue, WA with cul-de-sacs and winding streets has few shops and services within walking distance.

Maps courtesy of Lawrence Frank & Co. and the Sightline Institute