betacity


5 modes
August 22, 2016, 2:58 pm
Filed under: density, streets, Transit | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Advertisements


car reliance de vs
February 27, 2016, 8:53 pm
Filed under: Transit | Tags: , , ,

Buehler, Pucher and Kunert 2009



new Danish tunnel
March 28, 2015, 12:38 pm
Filed under: Transit | Tags: , , ,



good outcomes for higher taxes
January 6, 2015, 7:28 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , ,

Here is the last paragraph of Eric Jaffe’s article on gas taxes in the US. It projects some very good outcomes for higher gasoline taxes:

But in the long-run Americans would see some very real benefits from a price of gas that most closely reflected the true cost of driving. Fewer loved ones killed in car crashes. Healthier pregnancies and babies. More time spent with family and friends. Better access to jobs, and perhaps as productivity increased, higher wages. More livable developments and, with them, slimmer waistlines. Cleaner and quieter air. The sorts of things we can’t fit in our purses or wallets, but which cost us dearly just the same.

The Real Reason U.S. Gas Is So Cheap Is Americans Don’t Pay the True Cost of Driving, A gas tax that fully corrected for the social impact of car reliance would upend life as we know it, Eric Jaffe



who owns the street?
January 4, 2015, 3:09 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,
I recently saw a guy in an oversize pickup almost hit a girl while turning a corner. He yelled at her – watch where you’re going, you’ll get yourself killed – in his mind it was her fault. Some of us onlookers yelled back at him and he drove off. He wasn’t used to not getting his two tonne way.
Below is a history of what it used to be like: manslaughter charges, the driver responsible not the pedestrian, streets for multiple uses, fatalities a public issue. Car lobbies changed all that and might became right and today we have bullies in a playground.

It wasn’t always like this. Browse through New York Times accounts of pedestrians dying after being struck by automobiles prior to 1930, and you’ll see that in nearly every case, the driver is charged with something like “technical manslaughter.” And it wasn’t just New York. Across the country, drivers were held criminally responsible when they killed or injured people with their vehicles.

[…]

“If you ask people today what a street is for, they will say cars,” says Norton. “That’s practically the opposite of what they would have said 100 years ago.”

[…]

“If a child is struck and killed by a car in 2012, it is treated as a private loss, to be grieved privately by the family,” Norton says. “Before, this stuff was treated as a public loss – much like the death of soldiers.” Mayors dedicated monuments to the victims of traffic crimes, accompanied by marching bands and children dressed in white, carrying flowers.

[…]

Norton explains that in the automobile’s earliest years, the principles of common law applied to crashes. In the case of a collision, the larger, heavier vehicle was deemed to be at fault. The responsibility for crashes always lay with the driver.

[…]

The industry lobbied to change the law, promoting the adoption of traffic statutes to supplant common law. The statutes were designed to restrict pedestrian use of the street and give primacy to cars. The idea of “jaywalking” – a concept that had not really existed prior to 1920 – was enshrined in law.

The current configuration of the American street, and the rules that govern it, are not the result of some inevitable organic process. “It’s more like a brawl,” says Norton. “Where the strongest brawler wins.”

The Invention of Jaywalking, The forgotten history of how the auto industry won the right of way for cars, Sarah Goodyear



Oh, well, accidents happen
November 12, 2013, 1:04 pm
Filed under: Cities, streets, Transit | Tags: , , , ,

Here is the incredibly passive Daniel Duane who describes how drivers are literally getting away with murder and then concludes that we must all abide by the law and recommends staying safe by riding on stationary bikes in our basements. What crap. When are we going to take on the dangerous drivers and abetting police for taking away our roads?

From the New York Times opinion pages:

But studies performed in Arizona, Minnesota and Hawaii suggest that drivers are at fault in more than half of cycling fatalities. And there is something undeniably screwy about a justice system that makes it de facto legal to kill people, even when it is clearly your fault, as long you’re driving a car and the victim is on a bike and you’re not obviously drunk and don’t flee the scene. When two cars crash, everybody agrees that one of the two drivers may well be to blame; cops consider it their job to gather evidence toward that determination. But when a car hits a bike, it’s like there’s a collective cultural impulse to say, “Oh, well, accidents happen.”

[…]

“We do not know of a single case of a cyclist fatality in which the driver was prosecuted, except for D.U.I. or hit-and-run,” Leah Shahum, the executive director of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, told me.

Duane’s pathetic solution:

So here’s my proposal: Every time you get on a bike, from this moment forward, obey the letter of the law … I’m sticking to the basement and maybe the occasional country road.

Is It O.K. to Kill Cyclists? Daniel Duane, The New York Times



streetcar logic
November 6, 2013, 11:28 pm
Filed under: Cities, Transit | Tags: , ,

The drivers of sixty single occupancy cars removed and put in a streetcar that takes up roughly one thirtieth the space – a clear depiction of the economy of mass transit.